Valley of Sun 2019

In The Valley of the Sun, watercolor, gouache, and acrylic works on paper combine landscape and geometric abstraction to reimagine what progress and modernity might look like in another Latin America. Named in honor of Sogamoso, Colombia--"City of the Sun" to the Muisca, one of Colombia's indigenous peoples. The Valley of the Sun uses a speculative visual vocabulary to envision what regions threatened by extractive capitalism might look like under different, more equitable conditions. Rather than a literal depiction of an alternate Sogamoso, In The Valley of the Sun is a visual tone poem where modernist pattern-making, landscape painting, and traditional textile patterns combine to yield new possibilities.














Painting
Mark

carolyn castaño

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Color Ritmo ( Red and black)
Waterolor, gouache on watercolor paper




Ruana Interruption ( La W) Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper





Ruana Interruption ( La Voragine, Orange) Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper


















Tropical Geometries
painting, works on paper
2018











Ruana Interruption (Red and gold)
Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper mounted on plexi


Ruana Interruption ( Pink and Magenta) Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper mounted on plexi



Ruana Interruption ( Orange and Blue)Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper




Ruana Interruption ( Purple and Gold)
Watercolor, gouache on watercolor paper mounted on plexiglass




About Tropical Geometries
In Tropical Geometries, landscape and pattern are used to re-imagine ideas of modernity, progress, and identity in the Americas. Landscape painting, mapping, cartography, and botanical illustration co-exist simultaneously in these works with patterns and free-flowing shapes inspired by Pre-Columbian and indigenous textiles, such those of the Wayuu in Colombia. At the same time, elements of Neo-Concrete painting and 20th Century graphic design interrupt our contemplation of what some might see as a sublime, prelapsarian natural world by interjecting, fracturing, and bifurcating the visual conventions of the "landscape." By putting abstractions and patterns on the same plane as traditionally painted landscapes I hope to not just capture the historical simultaneity of cultures and ecosystems, but also a sense of their possible futures